An edition of: WaterAtlas.orgPresented By: Orange County, USF Water Institute

Water-Related News

Herbicide Application on Lake Crescent, 12/13

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 12/13/19. 

This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage hydrilla in the lake.

We will be spot-treating small areas of hydrilla throughout the lake.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS: NONE.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

Herbicide Application on Lake Jessamine, 12/11

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 12/11/19.

This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage submerged vegetation in the NW canal (near Jessamine Lane) for navigation purposes.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS:
•  DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY.
•  DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 5 DAYS.

These restrictions only apply to the canal near the intersection of Lazy Oaks Lane and Jessamine Lane.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400. 

Lake Alert issued for Orlando’s Lake Davis

To address citizen concerns related to water quality, the Stormwater Section has developed a public information system, "Lake Alert," to provide seasonal and localized warnings (and updates) for City of Orlando lakes. Out of a preponderance of caution, an announcement has been is provided below regarding the lake(s) where water quality may be of concern.

Type of water quality concern: Elevated E.coli counts

During routine water quality sampling for Lake Davis, lab results showed Escherichia coli (E. coli) counts that exceed state water quality standards. The City Stormwater staff are performing further lab tests to investigate the source. Please note that E. coli are naturally occurring bacteria that can be caused by domestic pets and wildlife.

City Stormwater personnel will continue taking water samples within the lake to monitor the bacteria levels. Once E. coli counts meet acceptable State water quality standards, updates will be sent via email, to the City's Lake Alert website and Lake Alert Hotline phone number.

As a health precaution, the City is advising that all water activities and irrigation from Lake Davis cease until further notice.

Public Notification – Please continue to call the Lake Alert number, 407.246.2220, for the most up-to-date information regarding your lake. During weekdays, the City's Lake Alert website, orlando.gov/lakealert will also have the latest information.

For further information please contact Lisa Lotti, Stormwater Compliance Manager, at lisa.lotti@orlando.gov.

Lake Alert issued for Orlando’s Lake Fairhope

To address citizen concerns related to water quality, the Stormwater Section has developed a public information system, "Lake Alert," to provide seasonal and localized warnings (and updates) for City of Orlando lakes. Out of a preponderance of caution, an announcement has been is provided below regarding the lake(s) where water quality may be of concern.

Type of water quality concern: Elevated E. coli counts

During routine water quality sampling for Lake Fairhope, lab results showed Escherichia coli (E. coli) counts that exceed state water quality standards. The City Stormwater staff are performing further lab tests to investigate the source. Please note that E. coli are naturally occurring bacteria, that can be caused by domestic pets and wildlife.

City Stormwater personnel will continue taking water samples within the lake to monitor the bacteria levels. Once E. coli counts meet acceptable State water quality standards, updates will be sent via email, to the City's Lake Alert website and Lake Alert Hotline phone number.

As a health precaution, the City is advising that all water activities and irrigation from Lake Fairhope cease until further notice.

Public Notification – Please continue to call the Lake Alert number, 407.246.2220, for the most up-to-date information regarding your lake. During weekdays, the City's Lake Alert website, orlando.gov/lakealert will also have the latest information.

For further information please contact Lisa Lotti, Stormwater Compliance Manager, at lisa.lotti@orlando.gov.

Herbicide Application on Lake Holden, 12/6

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The Environmental Protection Division will be performing an aquatic plant herbicide treatment on 12/6/19.

This treatment is part of an ongoing effort to manage hydrilla in the lake and canals.

WATER USE RESTRICTIONS:
•  DO NOT USE FOR ANIMAL DRINKING SUPPLY FOR 1 DAY.
•  DO NOT USE FOR IRRIGATION WATER SUPPLY FOR 5 DAYS.

Please direct any questions to the Environmental Protection Division at 407-836-1400.

These restrictions only apply to the area south of Laguna Street and to the canal between Raymar Drive and South Shore Road.

UPDATE: The Lake Alert for Lake Daniel has been lifted.

Please resume all normal water activities with the lake.


Original Alert below:

Lake Alert Issued Nov. 7th

As a precaution due to Lake Silver’s Nov. 5th lake alert for the presence of microcystins due to blue green algae, City of Orlando staff visually inspected downstream lakes Daniel and Sarah. No visible algae blooms were present on Lake Sarah. Algae from Lake Daniel was observed, therefore, out of a preponderance of caution. We are advising everyone to refrain from swimming, recreating, and irrigating in/from Lake Daniel until further notice.

For reference, cyanobacteria/blue-green algae are always present in the water. These blooms are caused by low-flowing, warm water and excess nutrients that can come from a combination of fertilizers, septic tanks, yard waste, and pet waste. Blue-green algae can pose a health concern based on its ability to produce toxins. Toxicity is hard to predict because a single species of algae can have toxic and non-toxic strains. Even blooms caused by known toxin-producing species may not produce toxins or may produce toxins at undetectable levels.

Because of the potential for harm to humans and pets, the City will begin performing weekly microcystin testing until the algae appears to have died. Please encourage your neighbors to register for the Lake Alert at orlando.gov/lakealert so they too will get important information about Lake Daniel directly.

In the meantime, as we stated above, the City would advise refraining from swimming, recreating and irrigating in/from the lake until further notice. Please be aware that as the algae dies, a “musty” or other unpleasant odor may occur.

If you should have additional questions, please email City of Orlando Streets and Stormwater staff at stormwater@orlando.gov.

Non-native fish are found throughout Florida’s freshwaters

Usually, when there’s news about escapees from medical research facilities, freshwater fish are not the obvious fugitives.

But that was the case with the pike killifish when researchers released about 50 of the fish into agricultural canals in the late 1950s.

Now, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has identified up to 22 non-native fish in Florida's fresh waters.

The agency in May added new rules that will "help proactively protect Florida from invasive species becoming established in the state," according to a news release.

While no freshwater fish made the list this year, the agency is "currently examining fish that are on the federal Lacey Act but not regulated by the state to see if they pose a risk to the state," a spokesperson wrote in an email.

The act, established in 1900, bans illegal wildlife trafficking in the U.S.

The state is a hotbed for the tropical freshwater fish trade. The subtropical climate is optimal for raising hundreds of varieties of nonnative fish, and sometimes those fish establish populations in state waterways.

Toilet-to-tap proposal sent back to Florida House for reconsideration

Florida is known for its freshwater springs, yet a House bill would bring water of a different type to taps.

HB 715, filed Tuesday [Nov. 19] by Zephyrhills Rep. Randy Maggard, creates statute for “water recycling for public water supply.”

The bill would compel the Department of Environmental Protection, with technical working groups, to adopt specified rules for using reclaimed water, contemplated as a statewide source for potable water.

“Developing water sources as an alternative to continued reliance on the Floridan Aquifer and surface waters will benefit existing and future water users and natural systems within the state,” the bill contends.

Given that half of “reclaimed water” is used efficiently, Maggard’s bill sees room for and necessity for improvement given Florida’s “current and future water needs.”

“Water recycling projects require significantly more planning and financial investment than nonpotable water supply projects and these projects need incentives to be implemented,” the bill asserts.

What incentives those are remain to be determined.

UPDATE: Lake Olivia Advisory LIFTED

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The advisory issued by FDOH on September 20, 2019 for Lake Olivia has been lifted.

Original advisory:

Title: Lake Advisory - Lake Olivia

The Florida Department of Health has issued a Health Alert for Lake Olivia near Gotha Road and Hempel Avenue in west Orange County.

DOH-Orange issues a Health Alert for Lake Olivia for the presence of Microcystin Toxin, which is produced and release by blue green algae (cyanobacteria).

DOH-Orange Environmental Health staff will post signage at Lake Olivia at the north boat ramp until further notice.

DOH - Contact Kent Donahue Kent.Donahue@flhealth.gov or 407-858-1418

Blue green algae (also known as cyanobacteria) can grow in many of Florida’s waterbodies. Large concentration, called blooms can change the water color to blue, green, brown, orange or red. Blooms can appear year-round but are more frequent in summer and fall. Blue green algae can grow rapidly and sometimes form a foamy surface scum and an unpleasant odor. Because algae blooms can remove oxygen from the water, fish kills can occur.

  • Don’t swallow, swim, wade, use personal watercraft, water ski or boat in waters where there are algae blooms. Algae blooms can cause ear, eye and skin reactions and hay fever and flu-like symptoms like diarrhea. Wash your skin and clothing with soap and water if you have contact with algae, discolored or smelly water.
  • Waters where there are algae blooms are not safe for animals. Pets and livestock should have a different source of water when algae blooms are present.
  • Don’t cook or clean dishes with water contaminated by algae blooms. Boiling the water will not eliminate the toxins.
  • Fillets from healthy fish caught in freshwater lakes experiencing blooms are safe to eat. Rinse fish fillets with